Spring Institute 2020 Webinar Registration


Several of our presenters have agreed to go digital and present webinars. Each session will be three hours and cost $75 for members, $125 for nonmembers (with the exception of the Positive Behaviors session, which will be 2 hours and $50 for members / $75 for nonmembers). CEU/CPD will be available for all sessions.

Thursday, March 19

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9:00AM – 12:00PM
The objective of this practical, hands-on seminar is to address the effects of compassion fatigue and burnout for school personnel and the school related mental health provider. Specifically, the learning outcomes and skills taught in this session will:

  • Instruct the participant on the definition and symptoms of secondary trauma, compassion fatigue and burnout
  • The role of self-care, including practical strategies for the working professional
  • Address thinking patterns that contribute to stress, compassion fatigue, depression and burnout, including mindfulness and cognitive strategies
  • Provide resources for support and self-help.
  • To instruct the participant when to seek additional professional help.

Melissa L. Holland, PhD, is an Associate Professor of School Psychology at the California State University, Sacramento) and has a private practice specializing in work with children, adolescents, and their families. She is both a licensed clinical psychologist and a certified school psychologist. Her publications focus on the emotional health of children.  Dr. Holland also presents workshops at regional and national conferences on the topic of children’s mental health and acts as a consultant in schools on the topic of social emotional learning and the use of mindfulness, cognitive, and behavioral strategies with students.

Stephen Brock, NCSP, LEP, is a professor and the School Psychology Program Coordinator at the California State University, Sacramento. A past president of both CASP and NASP, Dr. Brock is lead editor of the NASP publication Best Practices in School Crisis Prevention and Intervention and first author of School Crisis Prevention and Intervention: The PREPaRE Model. He has authored over 100 publications and has made more than 300 state and national conference presentations.

2:00PM – 5:00PM
The goal of this workshop is to help you better answer three questions: (1) What is dyslexia?  (2) What is reading-related phonological processing and how is it related to dyslexia? and (3) What should be assessed if dyslexia is suspected? To answer the question of what is dyslexia, a review of key findings will be provided.  Common myths will be discussed in addition to key findings because myths about dyslexia are pervasive. Deficits in phonological processing have been implicated in the development of dyslexia. Because school psychologists are uniquely qualified to assess phonological processing, the workshop will address using the CTOPP-2 and related measures for assessing phonological processing. Additional assessment recommendations will be provided if dyslexia is suspected. Practical issues such as the interface between dyslexia identification and eligibility for special education services because of a specific learning disability will be discussed.

Dr. Joseph Torgesen is an Emeritus Professor of Psychology and Education at Florida State University. At the time of his retirement from the university in 2008, he was the W. Russell and Eugenia Morcom Chair of Psychology and Education and Director of the Florida Center for Reading Research. Dr. Torgesen received his Ph.D. in Developmental and Clinical Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1976, and served on the Psychology faculty at FSU from 1976 until 2008. Dr. Torgesen’s early research focused on memory processes in children with learning disabilities, but most of his career was spent investigating and writing about the language difficulties of children with specific developmental reading disabilities (dyslexia). He is the author or co-author of over 230 books, book chapters, and articles on the psychology of reading, reading disabilities, and reading instruction. He is also the author, with Dr. Richard Wagner and Dr. Carol Rashotte, of two of the most widely used diagnostic tests for dyslexia, The Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processesing and the Test of Word Reading Efficiency.

Friday, March 20

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9:00AM – 12:00PM
The purpose of this workshop is to provide information regarding effective leadership and advocacy. Following a brief overview of major leadership models, the presentation will focus on how school psychologists can use many of their existing skills and knowledge to become effective leaders in schools, districts and at state or national levels.

Leslie Z. Paige, Ed.S. is the 2019-20 President of the National Association of School Psychologists. She has worked as a practitioner, graduate educator, project director and university administrator. Leslie has held many positions in the National Association of School Psychologists leadership, including treasurer and secretary. She has chaired and co-chaired numerous committees, including awards, leadership development, ethics, professional development, and publications and has been a member of two strategic planning committees. Leslie is also a past president of the Kansas Association of School Psychologists. She was the NASP School Psychologist of the Year in 1996 and the Kansas School Psychologist of the Year in 1994. She has received three NASP Presidential Awards and was also recognized with the Fort Hays State University Alumni Achievement Award in 1996. Her current focus is on developing leadership and advocacy skills for school psychologists.

2:00PM – 5:00PM
The presentation will review the laws and regulations associated with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”) governing special education student discipline with detailed discussion on convening manifestation determination meetings. The workshop will be delivered through a Powerpoint presentation with supplemental materials to include excerpts from legal decisions.

Carl Corbin of School and College Legal Services of California graduated from Gallaudet University with a Psy.S. in school psychology, worked over five years in public school districts as a school psychologist, is a LEP (inactive) and NCSP, and obtained his law degree at University of California, Boalt Hall.

Saturday, March 21

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9:00AM – 12:00PM
These two workshops combine to satisfy the six-hour requirement in law and ethics for licensed educational psychologists needed during each two-year licensing cycle. Law & Ethics also satisfies the three-hour requirement for Nationally Certified School Psychologists for each three-year renewal period.

The objective of this interactive presentation will be to review laws, regulations and ethics governing the role of school psychologists and Licensed Educational Psychologists (LEPs). Through the use of a foundational ethical problem-solving model, this presentation covers current ethical considerations through case studies and collaboration to assist school psychologists and LEPs in navigating various ethical dilemmas in daily practice.

Part I – Law will be taught by Carl D. Corbin, JD., General Counsel, School and College Legal Services of California.

Part II – Ethics will be taught by Kristin Makena.

9:00AM – 12:00PM

W-02: Law and Ethics: Part I – Law

1:30PM – 4:30PM

W-03: Law and Ethics: Part II – Ethics

Carl D. Corbin of School and College Legal Services of California graduated from Gallaudet University with a Psy.S. in school psychology, worked over five years in public school districts as a school psychologist, is a LEP (inactive) and NCSP, and obtained his law degree at University of California, Boalt Hall.

Kristin Makena, PhD(c), LEP, NCSP, is a special education administrator and former senior school psychologist for the San Diego Unified School District. Over the last decade her work has focused on mental health issues, crisis and trauma response and social-emotional wellbeing. Makena is a PhD candidate at Saybrook University where she is studying Integrated Mental Health. She is the CASP Ethics Specialist, past NASP Delegate and a recipient of CASP’s Nadine Lambert Outstanding School Psychologist Award.

1:30PM – 4:30PM
These two workshops combine to satisfy the six-hour requirement in law and ethics for licensed educational psychologists needed during each two-year licensing cycle. Law & Ethics also satisfies the three-hour requirement for Nationally Certified School Psychologists for each three-year renewal period.

The objective of this interactive presentation will be to review laws, regulations and ethics governing the role of school psychologists and Licensed Educational Psychologists (LEPs). Through the use of a foundational ethical problem-solving model, this presentation covers current ethical considerations through case studies and collaboration to assist school psychologists and LEPs in navigating various ethical dilemmas in daily practice.

Part I – Law will be taught by Carl D. Corbin, JD., General Counsel, School and College Legal Services of California.

Part II – Ethics will be taught by Kristin Makena.

9:00AM – 12:00PM

W-02: Law and Ethics: Part I – Law

1:30PM – 4:30PM

W-03: Law and Ethics: Part II – Ethics

Carl D. Corbin of School and College Legal Services of California graduated from Gallaudet University with a Psy.S. in school psychology, worked over five years in public school districts as a school psychologist, is a LEP (inactive) and NCSP, and obtained his law degree at University of California, Boalt Hall.

Kristin Makena, PhD(c), LEP, NCSP, is a special education administrator and former senior school psychologist for the San Diego Unified School District. Over the last decade her work has focused on mental health issues, crisis and trauma response and social-emotional wellbeing. Makena is a PhD candidate at Saybrook University where she is studying Integrated Mental Health. She is the CASP Ethics Specialist, past NASP Delegate and a recipient of CASP’s Nadine Lambert Outstanding School Psychologist Award.

9:00AM – 12:00PM
Students with ASD often display challenging behaviors that impede their academic, adaptive and social development and school psychologists are often called upon to provide support to the teaching team. This session will describe how to support the understanding and use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for individuals affected by ASD to promote positive prosocial behaviors that result in increased student engagement and well-being. The presenter will guide participants in how to use the research-based resources and EBPs. The participants will also learn which EBPs can be easily integrated into whole class universal interventions and instruction, which can be used for small group interventions and how to integrate EBPs into individual behavior intervention plans.

Ann England, M.A. is the Co-Coordinator of California Autism Professional Training and Information Network (CAPTAIN) and the Project Coordinator of the SELPA Content Lead Grant in ASD in partnership with Marin County SELPA. Ann is also a PENT Leader (Positive Environments, Network of Trainers). She has served as an appointee to the CDE Behavioral Intervention Plans (BIP) Stakeholder Workgroup to provide oversight of, and technical assistance and monitoring to LEAs regarding changes to the requirements related to the identification and provision of behavioral intervention services included in AB 86 and member of the Task Force on Education and Professional Development of the Legislative Blue Ribbon Commission on ASD.

Laura Blackburn, M.A., Program Specialist/School Psychologist, Placer County SELPA. Regional Implementation Lead, SELPA Content Lead-ASD, Statewide System of Support.

Registrations are currently closed! to view these webinars, please check back next week, thank you!